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This park in England only grows poisonous, hallucinogenic or deadly plants

This park in England only grows poisonous, hallucinogenic or deadly plants

This park in England only grows poisonous, hallucinogenic or deadly plants

During the visit, it is forbidden to touch, smell or taste anything. Ruth McGivern/Alnwick Garden

The aptly named “Poison Garden” is home to over one hundred species, several of which are lethal to humans. And some grow in our gardens…

No question of picking a beautiful bouquet there. After passing through the black metal gate adorned with two skulls, visitors are warned. In the poison garden, leaves, flowers, fruits or pollen are potentially fatal to humans. And the website is not likely to reassure us, certifying that ” some people occasionally lose consciousness after breathing in toxic exhalations while walking around the garden “.

Created in 2005 within the Alnwick Garden, north of england, the Poison Garden is home to more than one hundred species of poisonous, intoxicating or narcotic plants. ” Before entering, visitors receive safety instructions “says to the BBC Dean Smith, guide at the Poison Garden. Prohibition to touch, smell or taste anything, which, given the list of preserved species, would be unconscious. “The most poisonous plant preserved here is undoubtedly the castor bean plant, considered by the Guinness Book of Records to be the most poisonous in the world.“says Dean Smith to the British media. fans of the series breaking Bad will recognize Walter White’s favorite poison.

Opium and Cannabis

Rhododendron leaves, for example, contain grayanotoxin, a substance that attacks the nervous system. Ruth McGivern / Alnwick Garden

Aconite, laburnum, cherry laurel, bay yew, hellebore… the list goes on. And the most surprising thing is that certain plants grow in our gardens. Rhododendron leaves, for example, contain grayanotoxin, a substance that attacks the nervous system of anyone who ingests it. “However, you are unlikely to eat the leaves as they taste very bad.“, wants to reassure Dean Smith. Another amazing fact, if several rhododendrons grow close to each other, they will poison the soil so that no other plant can live there. Rhododendron honey, on the other hand, has a red color and, in small doses, has hallucinogenic properties. “In larger doses, it is fatalHowever, warns the guide.

Amy Thorp, gardener at the Poison Garden, doesn’t take a dim view of these plants. “It is we who are at homeshe explains. Some may have been there before us. So it’s up to us to learn as much as we can about their uses, because many plants here can be used to do good, not harm..” The most deadly can indeed be used to concoct remedies. Like the yew, used in the breast cancer treatment. Periwinkle, whose ingestion can be fatal, is also used in infusion for its benefits on blood circulation.

Other plants grown here have more unique properties: opium poppy, cannabis, or even khat. But make no mistake about it. The Poison Garden teams regularly organize visits dedicated to drug prevention, and these plants are under close surveillance. And, of course, destroyed at the end of each season.

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